Stop the Bloody Whale Slaughter on the Faroe Islands

On a group of islands just north of Europe, the traditional bloody whale and dolphin slaughter takes place every year. The Faroe Islands are a part of Denmark, where whaling is banned, but they have laws that are independent of Denmark's laws, so they are allowed to continue with this mass execution. Year after year, thousands of pilot whales, beaked whales and dolphins are chased into the bay by boats, where they are slaughtered.

Go to: https://secure.peta.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&page=UserAction&id=911

Whale tourists need realistic expectations

Tourists who visit Tonga's northern Vava'u island to swim with whales need to have realistic expectations about what will happen.

That's according to underwater photographer Tony Wu, who visits the island regularly to document the way humpback whales use the area to breed.

He says he managed to count 48 whale calves born in Port of Refuge harbour this last season, which is a lot.

But Mr Wu says the Tongan whale watching industry needs to make sure not to promise tourists that the whales will come close to them or touch them.

Go to: http://www.radioaustralia.net.au/pacbeat/stories/201111/s3373429.htm

Court rejects efforts to strip beluga whale protections

A federal judge this week rejected an attempt by Alaska to strip Cook Inlet beluga whales of Endangered Species Act protections. Last spring, the National Marine Fisheries Service designated critical habitat for the whales despite state’s lawsuit.

Go to: http://summitcountyvoice.com/2011/11/22/court-rejects-efforts-to-strip-beluga-whale-protections/

End comes closer for whaling ban

The opponents of whaling fear a return to commercial hunting is virtually inevitable within the next few years.

Conservation groups at the annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission believe the 1986 whaling moratorium cannot last much longer.

Go to: http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3911651.stm

PETA lawsuit alleges SeaWorld enslaves killer whales

Can killer whales sue SeaWorld for enslavement?

A lawsuit filed Wednesday by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and other "next friends" of five SeaWorld killer whales takes that novel legal approach.

The 20-page complaint asks the U.S. District Court in Southern California to declare that the five whales -- Tilikum, Katina, Corky, Kasatka, and Ulises -- are being held in slavery or involuntary servitude in violation of the 13th Amendment.

A PETA statement said the lawsuit is the first of its kind in contending that constitutional protections against slavery are not limited to humans.

Go to: http://articles.cnn.com/2011-10-26/justice/justice_killer-whale-lawsuit_1_killer-whales-orcinus-sea-world-trainers?_s=PM:JUSTICE

During 2008 and 2009 I was lucky enough to do some extensive solo travelling throughout the world and one of my favourite destinations was the last country I visited; New Zealand.  The main reason for this was the fact that on Sunday 15th February 2009 I got to go Sperm Whale watching in Kaikoura, a small town on the East coast of New Zealands South Island, famous for whale, dolphin, seal and bird watching.  I was told by the boats whale guide that I could expect to see 2 or 3 Sperm whales on our short trip and I was hugely excited.  Well, the chap was wrong, in total I saw 9 sperm whales flipping their huge tail in the air and diving below the surface to continue feeding.  We saw plenty of other whales that day blowing water up through their blow holes so even the guide was hugely excited.  He believed their was over 20 around us in the water which was an absolutely huge number.  I was so excited and I felt so honoured that I had managed to see such a magnificent beast on that day and it is an I will hold dear till the day I die.

I have always been a big animal lover and seeing them in their natural habit is such a great feeling.  On the way back to the harbour, I was reflecting about what I had seen and suddenly really started to miss my own families pet cat!  I could just imagine her running up and down her cat furniture getting all excited and wanting to play. She is a typical playful, pouncing cat but even though she is a domestic cat and I will never get to see her in her natural environment I am really pleased that she is so clearly very happy and stimulated.  As you can tell, the sight of watching such a great beast clearly had quite an emotional effect on me as I am quite a soppy chap!  The next plan I have is Safari in Africa to see some really big cats – I wonder if I will thinking about my little cat then as well?

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