Stop the Bloody Whale Slaughter on the Faroe Islands

On a group of islands just north of Europe, the traditional bloody whale and dolphin slaughter takes place every year. The Faroe Islands are a part of Denmark, where whaling is banned, but they have laws that are independent of Denmark's laws, so they are allowed to continue with this mass execution. Year after year, thousands of pilot whales, beaked whales and dolphins are chased into the bay by boats, where they are slaughtered.

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Whale tourists need realistic expectations

Tourists who visit Tonga's northern Vava'u island to swim with whales need to have realistic expectations about what will happen.

That's according to underwater photographer Tony Wu, who visits the island regularly to document the way humpback whales use the area to breed.

He says he managed to count 48 whale calves born in Port of Refuge harbour this last season, which is a lot.

But Mr Wu says the Tongan whale watching industry needs to make sure not to promise tourists that the whales will come close to them or touch them.

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Court rejects efforts to strip beluga whale protections

A federal judge this week rejected an attempt by Alaska to strip Cook Inlet beluga whales of Endangered Species Act protections. Last spring, the National Marine Fisheries Service designated critical habitat for the whales despite state’s lawsuit.

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End comes closer for whaling ban

The opponents of whaling fear a return to commercial hunting is virtually inevitable within the next few years.

Conservation groups at the annual meeting of the International Whaling Commission believe the 1986 whaling moratorium cannot last much longer.

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PETA lawsuit alleges SeaWorld enslaves killer whales

Can killer whales sue SeaWorld for enslavement?

A lawsuit filed Wednesday by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals and other "next friends" of five SeaWorld killer whales takes that novel legal approach.

The 20-page complaint asks the U.S. District Court in Southern California to declare that the five whales -- Tilikum, Katina, Corky, Kasatka, and Ulises -- are being held in slavery or involuntary servitude in violation of the 13th Amendment.

A PETA statement said the lawsuit is the first of its kind in contending that constitutional protections against slavery are not limited to humans.

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Whale watching in Australia is one of the biggest tourist attractions, and their many commercial companies who supply some incredible experiences.  All around the coast there are many options for seeing a variety of species from the Giant Sperm Whale, Blue Whales and the Humpback Whales to name but a few.

This page however is dedicated to providing Australian based technology resources which can be used to access data about whales online and of course lots of other stuff.

First an Australian VPN which is needed if you need to access any of the online Australian media channels like iView.

Just to clarify this demonstration is using a VPN server based in Australia, which will give you an Aussie IP address. You can use this from outside the country to watch geo-blocked stuff or from within Australia if you need some privacy (very likely given the Australian Governments track record).

Here’s another title which demonstrates watching the fantastic iView channel.

However if you are actually in Australia, you’ll already be able to access iView without restrictions, but will a server outside the country to access other sites.

BBC iPlayer Australia –

This post explains how an Australian can use a proxy/vpn server outside the country to change his address to a UK based one and watch BBC iPLayer. It also allows access to watch all the other major UK TV channels.

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The internet has brought great advantages for any body interested in wildlife particularly in their natural habitat.   For whale watchers it’s especially true, for anyone who isn’t lucky enough to be located in an area where whales are visible, you’d have to restrict your viewing to weekend trips away and holidays.

But the internet now gives you access to a whole plethora of resources, which we plan to put here.

British TV

For the nature lover this is a wonderful resource.  Not only is the website packed with information and up to date news on all areas of the environment, but they also produce some of the best documentaries in the world.  The BBC is particularly important and home to my favorite ever natural world broadcaster – Sir David Attenborough.

Unfortunately the programme section of the BBC website which is called BBC iPlayer is only accessible for residents of the United Kingdom.  However using the links below you can gain access to all of the British TV sites by using various technologies to hide your real location.

Resources for Accessing BBC iPlayer Abroad

Using an iPlayer Proxy –, this post demonstrates how you can hide your real IP address and watch the BBC anywhere.  There’s an interesting video which also shows how it works.

Anonymous Proxies – Watching BBC iPlayer Abroad : a very old post which is on a security blog.  The software is demonstrated and if you look in the comments you’ll see lots of questions which are normally answered by the author of the post.

Watch BBC in Spain – : although the title of this page states it’s for use in Spain, it actually doesn’t really matter where you are.  The proxy location is the IP address that the website sees, so if the proxy is based in the UK then so will you.  I like the video on  this page and it also has a discount code for the software demonstrated.

British TV Online –, although the BBC is by far the best resource for nature lovers there’s much more on the other British TV stations too.  ITV is the second biggest site and you can access the channels here –, but it’s also worth looking at Channels 4 and 5 which often have some good documentaries as well.



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